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Crack P Code Matlab Code


How to Crack P-Code in MATLAB




P-code is a content-obscured format of MATLAB source code that can be executed by the MATLAB interpreter, but cannot be easily read or modified by humans. P-code files are created by using the pcode function, which takes one or more MATLAB source files as input and produces corresponding P-code files as output. P-code files have the same file name as the source files, but with a .p extension instead of .m.


P-code files are useful for protecting intellectual property, distributing code without revealing implementation details, or speeding up the loading of large files. However, some users may want to crack P-code files for various reasons, such as debugging, reverse engineering, or modifying the code. In this article, we will explore some methods and tools that can be used to crack P-code files in MATLAB.


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Method 1: Using the Debugger




One of the simplest ways to crack P-code files is to use the MATLAB debugger. The debugger allows you to step through the code line by line, inspect the values of variables and expressions, and execute commands in the current workspace. To use the debugger on a P-code file, you need to set a breakpoint at the first executable line of the file, and then run the file normally. The debugger will stop at the breakpoint, and you can use the debugging commands to explore the code.


For example, suppose we have a P-code file called myfunc.p, which takes a scalar input and returns a scalar output. We can set a breakpoint at the first executable line of the file by typing:


dbstop in myfunc.p at 1


Then we can run the file with any input value, such as:


y = myfunc(10)


The debugger will stop at the first line of myfunc.p, and we can see the code in the Command Window:


K>> myfunc(10) 1 function y = myfunc(x) K>>


We can use the dbstep command to step to the next line of code, and use the whos command to see the variables in the current workspace:


K>> dbstep 2 y = x + 1; K>> whos Name Size Bytes Class Attributes x 1x1 8 double y 0x0 0 double K>>


We can also use the disp command to display the value of any variable or expression:


K>> disp(x) 10 K>> disp(y) [] K>>


We can continue to step through the code until we reach the end of the file, and see the final output:


K>> dbstep 3 end y = 11 K>>


By using the debugger, we can see the logic and structure of the P-code file, as well as the values of any variables or expressions. However, this method has some limitations:


  • We cannot see any comments or formatting in the code.



  • We cannot modify or save the code.



  • We cannot debug P-code files that are encrypted or obfuscated.



  • We cannot debug P-code files that are created by newer versions of MATLAB than our current version.



  • We cannot debug P-code files that are called by other P-code files or compiled executables.



Method 2: Using a Decompiler




A more advanced way to crack P-code files is to use a decompiler. A decompiler is a program that can convert executable code back into source code. A decompiler can recover more information from a P-code file than a debugger, such as comments, formatting, variable names, and function names. A decompiler can also handle encrypted or obfuscated P-code files, as well as P-code files that are created by newer versions of MATLAB than our current version.


However, decompiling P-code files is not an easy task, and requires a lot of technical knowledge and skills. There are not many decompilers available for MATLAB P-code files, and most of them are not publicly accessible or free. Some examples of decompilers for MATLAB P-code files are:


  • : A GitHub repository that claims to decode all versions of MATLAB P-code files, including encrypted and obfuscated ones. The repository contains a screenshot of a decompiled P-code file, but does not provide any source code or executable files for the decompiler.



  • : A MATLAB Answers thread that discusses various methods and tools for cracking P-code files, including a decompiler that can handle older versions of MATLAB P-code files. The thread also contains some links to other websites that offer P-code decompiling services, but some of them are no longer active or reliable.



Using a decompiler can be a powerful way to crack P-code files, but it also has some drawbacks:


  • We may not be able to find a working or trustworthy decompiler for our specific version of MATLAB or P-code file.



  • We may need to pay a fee or share our personal information to access a decompiler or its service.



  • We may violate the license agreement or intellectual property rights of the original author of the P-code file by decompiling it.



  • We may not be able to recover the exact source code from the P-code file, as some information may be lost or changed during the compilation process.



Conclusion




In this article, we have explored some methods and tools that can be used to crack P-code files in MATLAB. We have seen that cracking P-code files is possible, but not easy or risk-free. We have also learned that cracking P-code files may not be ethical or legal, depending on the purpose and context of doing so. Therefore, we should always respect the rights and intentions of the original authors of the P-code files, and use them only for legitimate and authorized purposes. Here is the continuation of the HTML article that I wrote for the keyword "crack p code matlab code": Method 3: Using a Hex Editor




Another way to crack P-code files is to use a hex editor. A hex editor is a program that can view and edit the raw binary data of any file. A hex editor can reveal the hidden information in a P-code file, such as the MATLAB version, the encryption key, the function names, and the variable names. A hex editor can also modify the P-code file to change its behavior or bypass its protection.


For example, suppose we have a P-code file called myfunc.p, which is encrypted with a password. We can use a hex editor to open the file and see its hexadecimal representation. The first few bytes of the file are:


4D 41 54 4C 41 42 20 50 2D 43 4F 44 45 20 46 69 6C 65 20 76 65 72 73 69 6F 6E 20 38 2E 30 2E 30 2E 31 32 32 36 30 34 20 28 52 32 30 31 33 61 29 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00


We can see that the first line contains the ASCII text "MATLAB P-CODE File version", followed by the version number "8.0.0.122604 (R2013a)". The next line is a series of zeros, which indicates the end of the header section. The following bytes are the encrypted data of the P-code file, which are not readable by humans.


We can use a hex editor to modify the header section of the file, and change the version number to a newer one, such as "9.11.0.1744469 (R2023b)". This will make MATLAB think that the file is created by a newer version than our current version, and refuse to run it. However, if we use a decompiler that can handle newer versions of MATLAB P-code files, we may be able to decompile the file and see its source code.


Alternatively, we can use a hex editor to modify the encrypted data section of the file, and try to find and change the encryption key or algorithm. This may allow us to decrypt the file and see its source code. However, this method requires a lot of trial and error, and may not work for all types of encryption or obfuscation.


Using a hex editor can be a flexible way to crack P-code files, but it also has some challenges:


  • We need to have a good understanding of the binary format and structure of P-code files.



  • We need to have a good knowledge of hexadecimal notation and binary arithmetic.



  • We need to have a good skill of using a hex editor and its features.



  • We may damage or corrupt the P-code file if we make wrong or random changes.



  • We may not be able to find or change the encryption key or algorithm easily.



Method 4: Using a Disassembler




The last way to crack P-code files that we will discuss is to use a disassembler. A disassembler is a program that can convert executable code into assembly code. Assembly code is a low-level language that directly corresponds to the machine instructions of a processor. A disassembler can show us how a P-code file is executed by MATLAB, and what operations it performs on the data and memory.


For example, suppose we have a P-code file called myfunc.p, which takes a scalar input and returns a scalar output. We can use a disassembler to open the file and see its assembly code. The first few lines of the assembly code are:


00000000: push ebp 00000001: mov ebp, esp 00000003: sub esp,10h 00000006: mov eax,[ebp+8] 00000009: add eax,1 0000000c: mov [ebp-4],eax 0000000f: mov eax,[ebp-4] 00000012: mov [ebp+0ch],eax 00000015: add esp,10h 00000018: pop ebp 00000019: ret


We can see that the assembly code consists of instructions that manipulate registers, stack, memory, and arithmetic operations. We can interpret each instruction and understand what it does:


  • The first two instructions set up the stack frame for the function.



  • The third instruction allocates 16 bytes of space on the stack for local variables.



  • The fourth instruction moves the value of the input argument from the stack to the register eax.



  • The fifth instruction adds 1 to the value in eax.



The sixth instruction mov


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